Clinton Still Favored Over Trump in 2016 United States Presidential Election

The United States presidential election is a little more than three months away, and Democratic Party candidate Hillary Clinton remains a solid -260 favorite (bet $260 to win $100) to become the first female ever to hold the position in the country.

American businessman and television personality Donald Trump is a +200 underdog (bet $100 to win $200) after officially being named the Republican Party’s nominee at the Republican National Convention that just wrapped up on Thursday in Cleveland, Ohio.

Despite former opponent Ted Cruz failing to endorse Trump at the RNC, Trump has picked up a little momentum and narrowed the gap a bit since last month, when Clinton was bigger -325 chalk and he was a +260 dog.

Before the convention, Trump announced Indiana Governor Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate to mixed reviews. A noted conservative and supporter of the Tea Party movement, Pence has also previously served as a member of the House of Representatives for Indiana.

The Democratic National Convention starts on Monday in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Among the notable speakers scheduled to appear during the DNC include former President Bill Clinton, President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and Clinton’s former opponent for the Democratic Party nomination Bernie Sanders.

While Sanders held out from endorsing Clinton for a while after she clinched the nomination, he finally chose to support her in hopes of keeping Trump out of the White House. The Vermont Senator was also rumored to be a VP candidate, although Virginia Governor Tim Kaine was announced as the choice on Friday night. Other possibilities for the VP pick had included Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, New Jersey Senator Cory Booker and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack.

Regardless, neither VP will move the needle much when it comes to the American public deciding who the 45th President will be on November 8. Voters will either go with the brash Trump, who has vowed to “make American safe again” and “make America work again” as the themes of the RNC’s first two days, or back Clinton based on her political experience and knowing that she will likely continue to work toward President Obama’s goals. Trump’s inexperience as a politician can be viewed as a positive or a negative depending on how Americans feel about President Obama’s two terms.

Some feel Trump offers a fresh perspective and would be a much-needed bold change in the White House. Others believe Clinton is much safer and knows how things work in Washington from her eight years as the First Lady to husband Bill from 1993 to 2001, eight years as a New York Senator and four more years as U.S. Secretary of State under President Obama.

However, many do not trust Clinton either because of how she handled the Benghazi attack along with her email controversy. If Americans want somebody new who will try to run the country like a business, they will choose Trump. If they want somebody with superior experience in the public sector, they will pick Clinton.