U.S. Open Tennis Odds 2024

Posted by Joe Ellison .

Arguably the best women’s tennis player of all time, Serena Williams, will walk away from the sport she dominated for the better part of the last two decades following the 2022 U.S. Open. As you can imagine, betting on the U.S. Open 2022 will reach a fever pitch as some wager with emotion during Ms. Williams’ swan song. However, this odds to win the 2022 U.S. Open betting guide come chock full of information and chances for others to win professional tennis’ last major tournament of the season.

Where to Bet on 2022 U.S. Open Tennis

Here are the best online sportsbooks to wager on the 2022 U.S. Open tennis tournament:

Top Rated Online Sportsbook
#1
BONUS
$750
  • Rollover: 5x
  • Games: all betting markets
  • Min Deposit: $10
  • Max. Cashout: n/a
Payout Speed 24-48 hours
#2
BONUS
$750
  • $750 Welcome Bonus
  • Min. Deposit $10
Payout Speed 48 Hours – 5 Days
#3
BONUS
$500
  • Rollover: 3x
  • Games: all betting markets
  • Min Deposit: $10
  • Max. Cashout: n/a
Payout Speed Less than 24 hours (Bitcoin) 15 days (check)
#4
BONUS
$1000
  • 100% up to $1,000 on crypto
  • Min. Deposit $10
Payout Speed 24 hours to process; minutes to transfer when you use Bitcoin
#5
BONUS
$3000
  • Cryto Bonuses
  • Min. Deposit $10
Payout Speed 48 Hours to 15 Days

2024 U.S. Open Tennis Odds

Odds to win the 2022 U.S. Open Men’s Draw

Despite his global dominance, Novak Djokovic has only won the U.S. Open three times and the last time came back in 2018. However, the Serbian tennis sensation heads into the last major tournament of the season as the +150 favorite to win the 2022 U.S. Open. Russian Daniil Medvedev’s only grand slam title came this time last year when he upset Djokovic 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 to win the 2021 U.S. Open. Unlike in other tournaments, Medvedev is nipping at Djokovic’s heels at +230 odds. Some pundits believe Carlos Alcaraz will follow in the footsteps of Rafa Nadal when his fellow countryman retires. So, it’s fitting that both Alcaraz and Nadal share +550 odds to win in New York this summer. Rounding out the top five favorites is outspoken and brash figurehead Nick Kyrgios who was this year’s runner-up at Wimbledon.

PlayerOdds to win U.S. Open 2022
Novak Djokovic+150
Daniil Medvedev+230
Carlos Alcaraz+550
Rafael Nadal+550
Nick Kyrgios+800
Jannik Sinner+1200
Stefanos Tsitsipas+1600
Alexander Zverev+2000
Felix Auger Aliassime+2000
Matteo Berrettini+2000
Taylor Fritz+2000
Andrey Rublev+3300
Cameron Norrie+4500
Casper Ruud+4500
Dominic Thiem+5000
Hubert Hurkacz+5000
Marin Cilic+6600
Roger Federer+8000
Sebastian Korda+8000
Andy Murray+10000

How to Read U.S. Open Match Odds

Here’s a quick tutorial on how to read the most popular U.S. Open tennis betting odds.

PlayerSpreadMoneylineTotal
Serena Williams+2.5+11545O
Naomi Osaka-2.5-18545U

When betting the SPREAD, you’re wagering on how many games the tennis player will win by. So, in the example above, Osaka needs to win by 3-or-more games to cover the spread or Serena needs to lose by 2-or-fewer games OR win the match outright.

When betting the MONEYLINE, you’re simply betting on which player you think will win the match outright. If you like the favorite Osaka , you’ll need to wager $185 for every $100 you’d like to win. If you like Williams to pull off the upset, wager $100 to win $115.

The match total is Over/Under how many games will be played. In this example the total line is Over/Under 45 games. Should Williams-Osaka play exactly 20 games, the bet is a PUSH, and you’re original wager is returned to you.

Odds to win the 2022 U.S. Open Women’s Draw

With Ashleigh Barty retiring from tennis earlier this year, Iga Swiatek has embraced the sport’s No. 1 world ranking and run with it. The 2022 French Open champion is the heavy 2-to-1 favorite to win the 2022 U.S. Open. The next closest threat to her second major title of the year is Simona Halep at 8-to-1. She won on Toronto’s hard court at the beginning of August, which was just her second title of the 2022 season. Familiar name and former champion Naomi Osaka is a 10-to-1 favorite to win the tournament again, but she’s just 13-9 this season and has reached only one tournament final since March of 2021.

PlayerOdds to win U.S. Open 2022
Iga Swiatek+200
Simona Halep+800
Naomi Osaka+1000
Coco Gauff+1100
Elena Rybakina+1400
Ons Jabeur+1600
Maria Sakkari+1800
Aryna Sabalenka+2000
Bianca Andreescu+2000
Belinda Bencic+2200
Paula Badosa+2200
Amanda Anisimova+2500
Serena Williams+2500
Leylah Fernandez+3000
Anett Kontaveit+3300
Karolina Pliskova+3300
Daria Kasatkina+4000
Emma Raducanu+4000
Garbine Muguruza+4000
Jelena Ostapenko+4000

Tennis Grand Slam Events

Just like in golf, the annual tennis grand slam consists of four major tournaments.

2022 U.S. Open Tennis Favorites

Iga Swiatek (+200)

iga swiatek wearing white and holding up fist at wimbledon

Swiatek’s 37-match winning streak was snapped after a third-round loss during Wimbledon. However, the No. 1 tennis player in the world is 37-11 on hard court surfaces over the past calendar year (heading into Cincinnati).

Novak Djokovic (+150)

Novak Djokovic US Open odds

Despite last year’s hiccup against Medvedev, Djokovic has won better than 84% of his matches on hard court and boasts an 82-13 record at the U.S. Open.

Simona Halep (+800)

Simona Halep blows kiss to crowd after beating Amanda Anisimova

Due to the pandemic, Halep’s 2020 season flew under the radar when she finished 25-3 and won three tournaments. She ended the year ranked as the world’s number one tennis player in 2017 and 2018. Halep’s a risky bet though as she’s won less than 69% of her hard court matches during her career.

Daniil Medvedev (+230)

Daniil Medvedev US Open odds

Your reigning U.S. Open champion, Medvedev was banned from competing in Wimbledon due to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. He’s 20-5 all-time at the U.S. Open and loves playing on hard court surfaces.

Naomi Osaka (+1000)

Naomi Osaka Wimbledon 2022 Odds

Since last winning the U.S. Open back in 2020, Osaka’s life story has experienced more downs than ups as she stepped away from the game for awhile to concentrate on her mental health. She’s just 13-9 on the 2022 season and has reached only one tournament final in the past 17 months.

Carlos Alcaraz/Rafa Nadal (+550)

Carlos Alcaraz apuestas Roland Garros

Alcaraz reached the quarterfinals of the 2021 U.S. Open, but was forced to retire due to injury. He was knocked out of the Canadian Masters recently by the tournaments No. 34 seed. Sub-optimal heading into this major.

Nadal is returning from a serious abdominal tear suffered during Wimbledon. At +550, he’s a risky bet heading into a tournament where he’ll be far from 100%.

2022 U.S. Open Event Details

U.S. Open Schedule

U.S. Open Schedule

The 2022 U.S. Open Tennis Tournament will begin on August 29 and run through September 11. The women’s final will be played on the evening of Saturday September 10 and men’s final on Sunday night.

How to Watch

How to Watch

The U.S. Open will air on ESPN’s family of networks and on its app. Encore airings will be shown on the Tennis Channel.

Defending Champs

Defending Champs

Daniil Medvedev upset Novak Djokovic in the 2021 men’s final, while 18-year-old Emma Raducanu became the first qualifier in tennis history – man or woman – to win a major title.

Last 10 U.S. Open Champions

Not only did Serena Williams win back-to-back-to-back U.S. Open women’s titles 2012-2014, but she was the tournament runner-up in 2018 and 2019.

YearMen’s ChampionWomen’s Champion
2021Daniil MedvedevEmma Raducanu
2020Dominic ThiemNaomi Osaka
2019Rafael NadalBianca Andreescu
2018Novak DjokovicNaomi Osaka
2017Rafael NadalSloane Stephens
2016Stan WawrinkaAngelique Kerber
2015Novak DjokovicFlavia Pennetta
2014Marin ČilićSerena Williams
2013Rafael NadalSerena Williams
2012Andy MurraySerena Williams
2011Novak DjokovicSamantha Stosur

U.S. Open History & Traditions

First Tournament

First US Tennis Championship tournament 1881

What would become known as the U.S. Open was first held back in 1881 with Rhode Island playing host and unlike the hard courts of today’s major, Newport Casino’s lawn courts were the welcomed playing surface. Richard Sears won each of the first seven singles championships as men were the only gender allowed to play in the early years of the tournament.

One fun perk of the tournament between 1884 and 1911 was that the defending champion automatically advanced to the finals the following year.

First “Open” Championship

First U.S. Open Tournament 1968

Nearly 90 years after the first U.S. tennis championship was held in Rhode Island, professionals were finally allowed to compete in the tournament, as the U.S. “Open” era kicked off in September of 1968.

Virginia Wade won the first Open on the ladies side, while Arthur Ashe defeated Tom Okker in a five-set marathon.

Arthur Ashe and His Court

Arthur Ashe Court US Open

Arthur Ashe was the first black tennis player to be named to the Davis Cup and only one to win Wimbledon, Australian Open, and U.S. Open singles titles.

The U.S. Open’s main court is named Arthur Ashe Stadium in his honor.

US Open Equal Pay

US Open Equal Pay Billie Jean King

Professional sports trailblazer Billie Jean King, seen here lobbying in front of congress, made it her life’s work to fight for equal pay between men and women. Her efforts led to the 1973 U.S. Open becoming the first major tournament to offer equal prize monies to both sexes.

Honey Deuce Cocktail

Honey Deuce Cocktail US Open

The Honey Deuce is the “official” drink of the U.S. Open tennis tournament. To make, you need:

  • 1 1/4 oz vodka
  • 3 oz fresh lemonade
  • 1/2 oz chambord
  • Honeydew melon balls

Simply mix the liquid ingredients in a high-ball glass with ice and garnish with melon balls.

Bovada

Casino of the Month July 2024

$750

BONUS

Min Deposit $10

/

Joe Ellison

Joseph is a dedicated journalist and horse racing fanatic who has been writing about sports and casinos for over a decade. He has worked with some of the UK's top bookmakers and provides Premier League soccer tips on a regular basis. You'll likely find him watching horse racing or rugby when he isn't writing about sport.

Back To Top
Back To Top